On January 1, 2018, the rules and procedures relating to IRS audits of partnerships, including those limited liability companies taxed as partnerships, (for purposes here, collectively, the “Partnerships”) will change. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 (“BBA”)(26 U.S.C.A. §§6221-6241), which was signed by President Obama on November 2, 2015, is generally intended to make it easier for the IRS to audit Partnerships and to assess and collect underpayments of taxes. It allows the IRS to assess and collect taxes directly from the Partnerships rather than from the partners or members (for purposes here, collectively, the “Partners”) as was the case under the old rules.
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After months, maybe years, of planning, raising capital, obtaining permits and waiting out construction, your gleaming new building is open and occupied. Soon, you’ll get a simple, one-page letter from your county’s Tax Assessment Office. What should you do if that letter indicates that your property is worth about a half-million dollars more than your appraisal reflects? Every Pennsylvania property owner is entitled to an annual appeal of their property assessment through the real estate tax assessment appeal process. Knowing the value of your property, your tax liability and whether you can reduce your tax burden through an appeal is as critical as managing any other area of your financial portfolio.

Calculating your Property Tax and Fair Market Value (FMV)

In Pennsylvania, real property typically incurs school, city/township and county taxes. Each of the three taxes is assigned a millage rate, which is used to calculate the property’s tax liability. To calculate the total real estate tax owed, the total millage of all of the taxing authorities is multiplied by the property’s assessed value. It is important to note that tax assessment appeals only challenge the assessed value of your property, NOT the imposed millage rate. Millage rates are published on each county’s website.


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Employers doing business in the City of Philadelphia must pay taxes on wages (including salaries, commissions, and other forms of compensation) and net profits. A new ordinance shores up current enforcement mechanisms, arming the City with aggressive penalties on overdue taxes and giving private citizens an enforcement role.

About Ordinance 19-1509

Under Ordinance 19-1509,

By: Marian Kornilowicz and Mark Leavy

Real Estate Tax.jpgIf you are a resident of Philadelphia, then you likely know about the ongoing turmoil surrounding Mayor Nutter’s pursuit of real estate tax reform. His plan is known as the Actual Value Initiative, or AVI, and will have the effect of increasing the real estate property taxes paid by