On July 26th join Cohen Seglias attorneys Matt Gioffre and Dan Fierstein for their seminar, “Killer Contract Clauses for Construction & Service” for the Mechanical & Service Contractors Association (M&SCA) in Blue Bell, PA. Matt and Dan will explain Killer Contract Clauses, how courts will interpret and enforce them, and will provide best practice tips for managing a project to minimize the impact of these contractual provisions.

Continue Reading Mechanical & Service Contractors Association: Killer Contract Clauses for Construction & Service

We are pleased to announce that eleven Cohen Seglias attorneys were selected to this year’s Pennsylvania Super Lawyers list and eight attorneys to the Pennsylvania Rising Stars list in the areas of Construction Litigation, Government Contracts, Employment & Labor, and Employment Litigation: Defense. The Super Lawyers list recognizes no more than 5 percent of attorneys in each state, and no more than 2.5 percent in each state for the Rising Stars list.
Continue Reading Cohen Seglias Attorneys Selected to the 2017 Pennsylvania Super Lawyers List

In Pennsylvania, it is well-established that a homeowner can assert claims for fraud and violation of Pennsylvania’s consumer protection statute – the Unfair Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Law (“UTPCPL”) – against a contractor based upon the contractor’s representations, even absent any contractual relationship between the homeowner and the contractor. Essentially, where a contractor makes a representation on which reliance is “specially foreseeable” and the homeowner relies upon the representation and sustains damages as a result, the homeowner may have a claim against the contractor. This scenario often comes into play where a homeowner asserts a claim against the builder where the homeowner is not the initial purchaser of the home, but rather a subsequent purchaser.  Continue Reading Adams v. Hellings Builders, Inc.: PA Superior Court holds that a homebuilder can be liable for representations made in its promotional materials

By now, you have probably heard enough from us about the new changes to the Pennsylvania Mechanics’ Lien Law. If a newsletter article and several blog posts were not enough, here is one more reminder that the long-anticipated Pennsylvania State Construction Notices Directory is up and running. Already, owners have been active in registering searchable projects. Continue Reading It’s Official: PA Construction Notices Directory Is Up and Running

On January 23, 2017, Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney signed into law a wage equity ordinance that makes it unlawful for an employer in the city of Philadelphia to ask about the wage history of a prospective employee at any stage of the hiring process. Under the new law, an employer may not condition employment on the job candidate’s disclosure of their wage history (which includes fringe benefits) or refuse to hire a candidate because of their refusal to respond to an inquiry about their past wages. The ordinance also prohibits employers from relying on a candidate’s wage history in order to determine the amount that it will offer a candidate unless the candidate has “knowingly and willingly” disclosed such information to the employer during the hiring process. Continue Reading Philadelphia Becomes First City to Prohibit Employers from Inquiring About Prospective Employees’ Past Earnings

The new — and much anticipated — Pennsylvania State Construction Notices Directory (“Directory”) is expected to go live this December 31. With this rollout, the PA legislature will have established a statewide directory system for owners to list projects and create a new lien notice requirement for projects in excess of $1.5 million. The Directory for the Pennsylvania Mechanics’ Lien Law, which was signed into law in October 2014, provides the following important changes:  Continue Reading PA Construction Notices Directory Goes Live December 31, 2016

Engineer with flag on background series - PennsylvaniaContractors doing work on publicly-owned projects in Pennsylvania may find it more difficult to recover statutory penalties and attorneys’ fees if the owner withholds funds in bad faith. Pennsylvania’s Procurement Code, which governs bidding on public projects and payment to prime contractors and subcontractors, is intended to “level the playing field” between government and contractor. Similar, but not identical to the private prompt payment act, the statute provides for the award to the contractor of interest, a penalty in the amount of 1% of the unpaid balance per month, and attorneys’ fees if the public entity acts in bad faith by refusing payment that is due to the contractor. Pennsylvania courts previously interpreted this statute to mean that if a jury determined that the public entity acted in bad faith, then an award of penalties and attorneys’ fees was required.

Continue Reading Contractor Payment Rights on Public Projects affected by PA Supreme Court Decision

Countdown FiveOver the past year, many states experienced budget crises that threaten public works spending and, in some cases, caused entire project shut downs. In Pennsylvania, a stalemate over the budget for Fiscal Year 2016-2017 lasted almost nine months, causing companies and non-profit grant recipients who had contracts with the Commonwealth to suspend their services or temporarily close. In New Jersey, Governor Christie and the legislature deadlocked over taxes, including an increase to the gas tax that would fund the Transportation Trust Fund (“TTF”). As a result, Governor Christie issued Executive Order No. 20, which shut down all construction projects funded by the TTF that were not “absolutely essential for the protection of the health, safety, and welfare” of New Jersey citizens. The Executive Order was issued on June 30, 2016, a list of projects subject to shut down was published on July 6, 2016 and the projects were shut down by July 8, 2016. Continue Reading State Budget Problems Threatening Public Construction Projects: 5 Key Points to Remember

In the recent case of Township of Salem v. Miller Penn Development, LLC, the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court invoked the often overlooked doctrine of nullum tempus occurrit regi. Read literally as “time does not run against the king,” as a general rule, nullum tempus allows the Pennsylvania state government or agencies to sue government contractors at any time, regardless of a statute of limitations defense. Nullum tempus also applies to claims brought by local governments, such as school districts, municipalities and counties, but only if the local government 1) brings its claims in its governmental capacity and 2) seeks to enforce an obligation imposed by law, as distinct from one arising out of a voluntary agreement.

Continue Reading It’s Good to be King: Time to File a Lawsuit Does Not Run Against the Pennsylvania Government

Philadelphia’s 2011 “Ban the Box” lawemployment-applications.jpg, which restricts an employer’s ability to inquire into a job applicant’s criminal history at the initial stages of the application process, is “old news” – but the recent changes that went into effect on March 14, 2016 are anything but. Our firm will be getting into the details of this recent development at its 8th Annual Labor and Employment Seminar (April 27, May 4, and May 12).

In short, every Philadelphia employer needs to make the necessary changes to its job application procedures to comply with the broader requirements of the law that former Mayor Michael Nutter signed into law before leaving office in December 2015.

The 2011 Version

As enacted in 2011, Philadelphia employers with 10 or more employees could not include the “box” on a job application asking about criminal records. Employers were not permitted to ask about criminal records at an initial interview, but could do so after the first interview. And, when asking about a criminal background, employers were prohibited from asking about arrests or anything other than criminal convictions. Violations of the law carried up to a $2,000 penalty.

Continue Reading Attention Philadelphia Employers: New and Important Changes to the “Ban The Box” Law